Fargo on FX
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Verdict: See It!     
Lisa's Review
Stop!
Drop everything, and proceed directly to your DVR to program FX's new Fargo.
It's the biggest and best original series launch so far this year, and is not to be missed.
If you liked the Coen Brothers' masterpiece of the same name, you'll love this 10-episode limited dramedy series, produced by the Brothers C, which they're promoting as an original adaptation.
The characters and plot line of the "True Crime" story look and feel the same, but they're actually all new and updated.
Don't be taken in, however, by the humorous qualifier at the beginning that says the story is true, but the names have been changed, yada yada yada.
That's the first of many dark jokes.

With the introduction of malicious drifter Lorne Malvo, played adroitly by Billy Bob Thornton, this series gives you the next great TV anti-hero, ala Tony Soprano and Walter White.
They're the guys who are evil incarnate, but you root for them anyway.
He's Javier Bardem's Anton Chigurh from No Country for Old Men, in snow boots.
He drifts into the small Minnesota town of Bimidji and wrecks havoc in the lives of hapless insurance salesman Lester Nygaard (Martin Freeman), as well as the entire police force and a number of others, both good and bad, in the surrounding counties.

Look for great performances from a supporting cast that includes Colin Hanks, echoing his dad Tom; Alison Tolman who might as well be Ellen's sister, Better Call Saul/Breaking Bad's Bob Odenkirk, Oliver Platt, Keith Carradine and Kate Walsh, all with twanging Minnesota accents and mannerisms.
Those affectations might wear a little thin after awhile, but the subtle humor, coincidences and jaw-dropping plot twists will intrigue you for the duration.

FINAL VERDICT: SEE IT!

Sean's Review
It isn't uncommon for a television series to be based on a movie, but the 1996 film Fargo, with its particular mixture of violence and humor that could only come from the minds of the Coen Brothers, seems like a strange beast to translate to a cable series.
Initially, the Academy Award-winning film hovers its shadow quite heavily over the show, which features characters, shots, and elements of the story that strike up a familiarity with the movie counterpart.
However, it becomes clear that the film was more of an inspiration than a work to copy, and despite some scenes that seem to be varied only slightly for this new format, the TV show manages to take us on its own journey, and an exciting one at that.
The macabre sense of humor carries over quite nicely, and we are treated to a solid group of performers, including relative newcomer Allison Tolman, Colin Hanks, Martin Freeman, and Billy Bob Thorton, who's been given his finest role in years.

FINAL VERDICT: SEE IT!

Liz's Review
There's been a few of these movies being made into TV shows as of late: About a Boy, Hannibal, Friday Night Lights, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. ... What's interesting is how each of these shows treats the original source material: as a jumping off point? The entire world of the show? A loose translation? FX's Fargo takes the style and characters from the film, but spins itself into a new plotline that can hopefully sustain itself for a while, because I want to watch this show forever! What at first seemed like shameless ape-ing of the Coen brothers style and brand turned into a show that had a life of its own. The casting is impeccable and the performances strong. The writing is so entertaining and the look of the show is wonderful. For a weird, weird show about murder and strange characters in the Midwest? FX's Fargo makes it all very appealing.

FINAL VERDICT: SEE IT!

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